4. Analysis
5. Synthesis
NEXT
1. Knowledge
Graphic from Wikipedia: View Source Article
6. Evaluation
VILD interfere with cognitive skills and emotions. Learn More:
Because vision is so basic to human function, when impediments are present, teachers’ efforts to engage cognitive functions are hampered. For some children, visual impediments are so dominant, they prevent learning and cognitive skills development.
3. Application
Main Menu
Primary Domains:
Click the cognitive domain name to zoom in on that portion of the ‘Bloom’. Click ‘Primary Domains’ to reset.
2. Comprehension
Play with the Taxonomy, then click NEXT to learn how vision development impacts on classroom learning.
Teachers refer to Bloom’s taxonomy when building lessons to ensure tasking is appropriately complex and varied. 
Bloom’s Taxonomy is to the teacher what a palette and brushes are to the painter.  It divides cognitive behaviours into six increasingly complex domains: 
Fact 2: Children with visual impediments show maladaptive behaviour.
Fact 3: Vision is almost always a part of the problem, and a part of the solution.
Read this study on Visual Impediments to Learning from the University of Lethbridge
Fact 4: We don’t check for vision problems.
Fact 1: What we can’t see can be a big problem.
Teachers, psychologists, and pediatricians receive no training in vision science, so they typically do not advise parents about the critical role vision plays in child development, behaviour, and learning.
Select an Item from the List Above
Response Area 4
Only about 20% of children in Canada and the US will have a comprehensive eye exam before they start school. Most children with VILD will never get the help they need.
Response Area 2
About 80% of children struggling with reading concerns have some sort of VILD that is contributing to the problem.
Response Area 3
25% of children struggle with visual impediments to learning and development (VILD).
VILD are a common cause of misdiagnosis and improper treatment of behaviour and learning problems. Ignoring vision means needless suffering for affected children.
Fact 1: What we can’t see can be a big problem.
Learn More about Visual Impediments to Learning and Development, and how these impact on children and teachers, starting here: 
VILD are a physical burden, not a psychological one. Still, because VILD often hurt (physically) as well as interfere with cognitive function, they can quickly become psychological problems as the child encounters obstacles to meeting expectations. (Imagine trying to study while someone keeps distracting you, while you also have a headache.) Children with moderate VILD often show emotional outbursts, and all the classic signs of ‘learning disabilities’ and attention problems.  Children with severe VILD can appear to have significant developmental challenges. 
Go to About VILD Page
Fact 2: Children with visual impediments show maladaptive behaviour.
Psycho-educational assessments for children with visual functional impediments very often show apparent problems with visual perception and other mental skills that rely heavily on visual processing. Likwise, VILD can also present as emotional  disturbances, even physical coordination problems.
Research shows us that 80% or more of children with learning and behaviour concerns have some sort of significant underlying visual functional impediment.
Addressing visual impediments to learning and development (VILD) often means that the suspected problems will dissipate or resolve. Testing is best done AFTER vision function has been assessed and any measurable concerns have been addressed.
Fact 3: Vision is almost always a part of the problem, and a part of the solution.
Despite extensive use of psychological testing that tells us children with learning problems have ‘visual processing’ difficulties, most schools and pediatricians pay little heed to the formal assessment of vision itlself. While 1 in 4 children struggle with functional vision problems, at best only 1 in 5 will have a comprehensive vision exam before school starts. This leaves most vision problems unchecked, and those affected children with no help.  The uptake to vision exams is even lower in some populations, such as in more remote/rural communities where typically fewer than 10% of children are assessed. By far, most children with vision concerns never get the help they need before they being school. Most of these will be put through psychological and medical testing and treatments that never address the root causes of their difficulties.  The costs to education and health systems, and to families, is enormous.
http://oepf.org/visual-impediments-to-learning/
Patrick
VILD are a physical burden, not a psychological one. Still, because VILD often hurt as well as interfere with cognitive function, they can quickly become psychological problems as the child encounters obstacles to meeting expectations.  Children with moderate VILD often show emotional outbursts, and all the classic signs of ‘learning disabilities’ and attention problems.  Children with severe VILD will often appear to be significantl developmental challenges.